• kellyhurley

Why Go to Therapy?

Updated: 6 days ago

There are signals to watch for when evaluating if it is time to give therapy a try. If you find yourself thinking or saying any of the following, it may be time to talk to someone.


LEARN HOW LETTING GO AND FORGIVING WILL IMPROVE YOUR QUALITY OF LIFE

Holding a grudge isn’t a diagnosable condition, but it does have serious physical, emotional, and relational consequences. Through therapy you can learn to resolve these issues for yourself and move on.

  • “I’ve endured a very difficult experience, and I can’t stop thinking about it and/or dreaming about it.”

  • “When my family and friends try to help, they say things that make me angry and hurt rather than help.”

  • “Everything I feel is intense and feels out of control.”

  • “I just can't stand feeling this way any longer (sad, angry, anxious, empty).”

COUNSELING IS HAVING A PLACE TO EXPRESS EMOTION AND ASSERTIVENESS

Therapy is a laboratory for you to explore, experiment, and practice behaviors that are scary in the rest of life. Shy people can practice confrontation. Detached people can experiment with expressing emotion. When you’ve tried this out a few times in session, you may be ready to take it out into the world.

  • “I can’t stop thinking about this stuff; I want to make it stop.”

  • “I’ve tried everything I can think of to change, and it’s not working.”

THIS IS ABOUT HAVING TIME TO FOCUS COMPLETELY ON YOURSELF

Therapy is a course where you are the subject matter. You can explore yourself, go deeper into your current thoughts and feelings, or just sit and “be” for a while. This vital practice has become a forgotten art in our world today.

  • “I have unexplained and recurrent headaches, stomachaches, or a rundown immune system.”


THERAPY CAN OFTEN HELP IN REACHING FITNESS GOALS

Therapists aren’t often personal trainers, but it’s commonly understood that physical fitness is as mental as it is physical. Therapy can help you overcome the roadblocks that prevent you from reaching your goals.

  • “I’m using a substance (or substances) more than I want in order to cope.”


LEARNING ABOUT LOVING AND ACCEPTING YOURSELF

Many people have difficulty with this, and they’re not necessarily depressed or afflicted with another mental disorder. Therapy can help you explore roadblocks to self-esteem and teach you practical ways to make your happiness a priority.

  • “I’m getting bad feedback at work; I’m worried that I’m going to get fired.”


BECOME THRIVING IN YOUR CAREER

You say you’re unhappy where you are, why aren’t you striving for something different? Is fear, hard work, or interpersonal conflict holding you back? Therapy can be the catalyst for healthy change in your career.

  • “I don’t get the same enjoyment that I used to from my hobbies and interests.”


UNDERSTANDING YOUR PURPOSE IN LIFE

Many therapists love to dive in and help you find out who you are on a deep level, helping you uncover the passions buried under the busyness of life. A desire for this time to self-reflect may mean that…

  • “My friends are really concerned about me and are helping me the best they can, but it’s just not enough, and I’m afraid I’ll lose them if I keep pushing them.”

  • “My relationships are strained, or I’m avoiding people altogether.”


MAKING A GOOD MARRIAGE GREAT

Many relationships are functional, but are no longer fun. Couples counseling can help improve communication and strategize ways to return passion and excitement to a marriage.


BEING A FANTASTIC PARENT

Many of us, despite our own objections, revert to parenting patterns we observed in our own childhood. Therapy can help you get out of this rut and become the parent you want to be (and your children need).

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